ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHIC DARKROOM

Here is my darkroom, my trip pal during many years, place of freedom where I learnt to make and re-make from the mistakes commited.

I was looking for these negs from a time, to publish this post for future generations to come to know what this my dream darkroom, one day was.

I think that soon could be considered as “archaeological” stuff.

Analog Photographic Darkroom. Beseler 4x5 enlarger with Schneider, apochromatic 150mm. lens, cold light head and Compensating Metronome by Zone VI Studios. © Jesus Coll

 

Dry Zone

Analog Photographic Darkroom. Beseler 4x5 enlarger with Schneider, apochromatic 150mm. lens, cold light head and Compensating Metronome by Zone VI Studios. © Jesus Coll

Analog Photographic Darkroom. Beseler 4x5 enlarger with Schneider, apochromatic 150mm. lens, cold light head and Compensating Metronome by Zone VI Studios. © Jesus Coll

Beseler 4×5 enlarger with Schneider, apochromatic 150mm. lens, cold light head and Compensating Metronome by Zone VI Studios. As the head light was American and worked at  115V., the darkroom had both current tensions 125V-220V.

Analog Photographic Darkroom. Compensating Metronome by Zone VI Studios. © Jesus Coll

Compensating Metronome by Zone VI Studios was an item that made ones life easier. As one needed the hands free to perform dodgings and burnings with masks while exposing the paper, a regular enlarger timer was not the right stuff. Ansel Adams proposed an easy method as to get a music metronome or to have a casete recorder with a bip (or metronome) recorded at intervals of one second.

Cold light heads tend to produce less light at the beginning of exposure, getting a more powerful output while getting warm. Because this inaccuracy, Zone VI Studios developed the Compensating Metronome.

The light head had a prove in which the Compensating Metronome was connected to. Practically speaking, an exposure time of 60 seconds (bips), the bips might be quite more spaced than a second at first, while getting the head warm, at the end they were quite fast. The result was that an exposure of 60 bips, was always exact no matter the head was cold, warm or hot.

Compensating Developing Timer by Zone VI Studios. © Jesus CollThe enlarger was operated by pressing the foot pedal seen at right, providing free hands to work on exposure. The half, green circle, is the luminescent adhesive which helped locate it on the dark and not to step it accidentally, especially when processing color prints in total darkness.

 

Wet Zone

Analog Photographic Darkroom. General view of the wet zone. Trays could be in water bath if needed, especially when developing Ilsfochrome. © Jesus Coll

General view of the wet zone. Trays could be in water bath if needed, especially when developing Ilfochromes.

Analog Photographic Darkroom. Floating lid containers to avoid air contact with stock and ready to use solutions. © Jesus Coll

Floating lid containers to avoid air contact with stock and ready to use solutions.

Analog Photographic Darkroom. A rubber band under the shelf was used to hang negatives and test prints to dry. © Jesus Coll

A rubber band under the shelf was used to hang negatives and test prints to dry. Over the shelf are seen negative developers (HC-110 y TMax), print developer (Dektol), Kodak Rapid Selenium Toner to increase print permanence, as well as (PhotoFloo) and Stop Bath.

Analog Photographic Darkroom. Developing agents and other chemical products to make custom developers and formulas, along the weighting scale. © Jesus Coll

Developing agents and other chemical products to make custom developers and formulas, along the weighting scale.

Analog Photographic Darkroom. Leonard Thermostatic valve with thermometer to wash negatives under control. © Jesus Coll

Leonard Thermostatic valve with thermometer to wash negatives under control.

Analog Photographic Darkroom. Thermometer on the general faucet to control water temperature while miximg chemicals. © Jesus Coll

Thermometer on the general faucet to control water temperature while miximg chemicals.

Analog Photographic Darkroom. "Aerial" hot/cold water system. © Jesus Coll

“Aerial” hot/cold water system.

Analog Photographic Darkroom.  Compensating developing timer,  Zone VI Studios inc. © Jesus Coll

Analog Photographic Darkroom. Probe connected to CDT through the wall to get a more"neat" finish. © Jesus Coll

Probe connected to CDT through the wall to get a more”neat” finish.

Compensating Developing Timer by Zone VI Studios, was very useful to develop negatives as well as prints. Display brightness and the volume of the every 30 seconds bip, could be custom adjusted. More over to mesure real minutes and seconds, it provided two logarithms functions to develop negatives or prints as a compensating timer.

Compensating Developing Timer by Zone VI Studios. © Jesus CollIt worked quite the same as the enlarging Compensating Metronome. There was a probe that was placed on the developer tray to monitor temperature. Depending on the temperature, the timer run faster or slower. Five minutes developing time, always represented “five minutes”, despite in summer months, the real time passed was  shorter than five real minutes. Displayed at left the foot pedal with which it operated. The half, green circle is the luminescent adhesive which helped locate it on the dark.

 

Analog Photographic Darkroom. Dry mount press to mount and frame photographs. © Jesus Coll

Dry mount press to mount and frame photographs. This mounting system with acid free, adhesive sheets is my preference to achieve a perfect flat and archival print.

Analog Photographic Darkroom. At right a cutter to make beveled over matts and tacking iron to help centering the print on the board. © Jesus Coll

At right a cutter to make beveled over matts and tacking iron to help centering the print on the board.

By | 2017-02-03T09:02:47+00:00 April 3rd, 2016|

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